Coconut Oil Right for YOU?

Is Coconut Oil Right for YOU?

Coconut products with fresh coconut, Coconut milk and oil

Every few months we see news of the latest ingredient. Coconut oil is the latest on the news But how do you know it is the right or even safest ingredient for YOU?

They hire great marketing agencies to tout their new product… one they have invested a lot to develop.  But there is a gap between the market hype and consumer best choice. Here’s my insider scoop on what you’re being sold.

There are two different type of product companies.  Those who develop blends to solve different problems. And those who base all of their products on a KEY ingredient.  Right now that ingredient is coconut oil.

But is coconut oil right for you?

Coconut oil is a tropical oil obtained from the nut of a palm tree. The jar of coconut oil in your cupboard validates that this oil solidifies at room temperature.

In comedogenicity tests that date back to the 1960s which are the gold standard for products produced since, it was shown to be a comedogenic ingredient – meaning those oils tend to clog pores. If you are using a product with coconut oil in it and noticing more breakouts…it’s probably your product.

If it is only on your skin temporarily, as in a makeup remover, it’s probably fine.  But it shouldn’t be left on your skin.  People who use it as a hair conditioner should keep an eye on scalp or hairline breakouts it could trigger.

If you bleach or color your hair or it is weather damaged from time in the sun, coconut oil might be a fine conditioner, but try to keep it off your scalp.

If you have fine, thin, dry, sensitive skin, you might be okay with it.  But a product with jojoba oil might be a better choice.  It is an ingredient that doesn’t solidify at room temperature.  Its comedogenicity rating is nil.  It actually has the ability to emulsify sebum so helps acne clients rather than aggravates their skin.

So when the next…newest and greatest ingredient shows up in marketing…save yourself some money.  Investigate the ingredient first to see how it might work with your skin.

If you need help trying to sort through all the products on the market and their hype…speak to a trained qualified esthetician who has taken the advanced classes to help you make smart decisions.

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semi-permanent or permanent makeup

Lip color should  not be considered semi-permanent

Lip color should not be considered semi-permanent

How can I get semi-permanent makeup?

I routinely get questions about semi-permanent makeup. Women like the idea as it sounds less committed. But there are some illusions here.  Let’s explore them.

Definition of a tattoo:

Pigment implanted into the skin creates a tattoo. The needle goes through the epidermis (the part of the skin we see) into the dermis which is underneath it. As it heals, any pigment in the epidermis exfoliates off.  The pigment in the dermis stays there. The color can fade but the molecule remains.

Semi-permanent makeup

Some countries feel that because the color does fade with exposure to UV it doesn’t last a lifetime.  Since it fades they classify it as semi-permanent.  In the USA the thought is a little different.  Think of hair color for a minute.  A rinse is a temporary color that washes out with the next shampoo or two.  Semi-permanent color fades out over several weeks or a couple of months. Permanent hair color has to grow out.  This situation doesn’t exist for a cosmetic tattoo.

Cosmetic tattoos stay in the skin

Once it is in the dermal tissue, the molecule of color stays there.  Pigment molecules were identified via biopsy in tattoos where they color is gone. The color will eventually fade and need re-enhancement. How quickly it fades depends on the volume of color implanted. With microblading, the technician only makes a single stroke of color application. This means there will be significant fade in just a few months.  Other techniques reinforce the color stroke making it last much longer. A solid fill power brow can last for years with good sun protection.

Microblading only works for eyebrow hair strokes.  Never eyeliner or lip color due to scarring.  The only way to get less color in lips would be to apply less. But without reinforcement, the color has a higher risk of fading unevenly.

Can’t I just let it fade away?

Absolutely. Without re-enhancement the color will continue to fade.  But it doesn’t always fade evenly.  It may fade with lighter and darker areas. This isn’t technician error, it’s rather caused by the physical structure of the epidermal-dermal junction with thicker and thinner areas. To keep your work looking fresh and color-true, a re-enhancement every two to five years is best.  Lipcolor may be longer.

With a cosmetic or any other tattoo, it’s always best to approach it as permanent. Avoid fad styles and go with a more conservative, classical approach. Something that will enhance your natural looks and make you feel good about yourself for years to come.

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Brow Secrets for Success

Want great brows?  Here are some secrets to help you get the brows you’ve wanted so long.
 
Each of us has our own unique vision of what eyebrows should look like.  Others have said to me, “I don’t know what they really should look like. It’s confusing.” I help them discover their perfect brow.
 
And then there are the fashion fads. Right now big bold brows that almost meet in the center of the nose and extend out beyond a normal brow are popular. These might look well on a tall statuesque model. On a smaller person, they look over done.
 
Your face, your bones, dictate the best brow shape and placement for you. Ignore this, and you will never be completely happy with the result. If you want fashion trendy brows – use cosmetics. Don’t have them tattooed this way. It is a recipe for unhappiness.
 
Keep in mind that while permanent cosmetics do fade, it can take 20 years or more for all the color to disappear. A shadow of color can last even longer. Get it done right in the first place. Once done, there are limitations to what change or “fixes” work.
 
Here are some tips skilled professionals wish every potential client knew.
1. Everyone’s brows are asymetrical. The two sides of our face are not the same. You will always have a favorite brow. Your technician can help make them look closer to the same, but they will never be identical. One eyebrow bone is naturally higher. That is the way we are. Skilled technicians have ways to minimize this but they can’t eliminate it.
 
2. Your technician should measure and mark the plan for your eyebrows. Freehand work is not the way to get the most symetrical brows.  
 
3. There is no one right style of cosmetic tattooed eyebrow for everyone. Not everyone looks good with the same haircut. It’s the same with your brows. You need a technician skilled in a variety of styles to best help you.
 
If you have been filling in your brows with a pencil or powder, a powder fill, or ombre technique may be best for you. From arm’s length away, you will look very natural, just like you have a bit of makeup in your brows. Those used to this look find the hair strokes or microblading look like there are bare spots.
 
4. Different techniques need different re-enhancement. Microblading needs a re-enhance every 8-12 months. It is best for those who want individual hairs to show and don’t mind the extra expense.
Powder fill or ombre (shaded) brows can last 2-5 years before they need re-enhanced.
 
5. Your medications and lifestyle can affect color retention. Your eyebrows will need daily SPF for longer lasting results.
 
Experienced technicians know that if it has been more than 5 years clients need a “new” brow. Re-enhancement perks up the exisiting color. More faded work needs a follow up visit to bring back the brow the client wants.
That means they need a new brow procedure which includes the needed second visit.
Do your research.  Go in for a consultation.  If you and the technician are of the same mindset, go for it.  Enjoy those brows.
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Winter Permanent Cosmetic BFF Special

BFF Permanent Makeup Special

Permanent Cosmetics make your life easier!

Give your confidence a boost and getting ready in the morning a breeze.

Bring a friend and save!

For a limited time if you bring a friend and each have a permanent makeup service you will  both save !!

 New procedures – $75.00 off.  Re-enhancement procedures (single visit) $50 off.

OR…. Have 2 procedures done at the same visit and we will give YOU the same discount on each procedure.

Offer valid through January 31, 2017.  Schedule your appointment now!

Call:  541-344-7789

Coupon code: BFFNow

Limited offers available

I work by appointment only to assure you quality and personalized attention.

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Why Estheticians Wear Gloves

My recent post on wearing gloves got positive support from many, thank you.  I did find it sad that one spa said they got a negative review for their technicians wearing gloves.  This shows the need for consumer education.  Maybe a little flyer or insert on your web page that explains how you are protecting clients by wearing gloves.  Feel free to use the following to promote client safety and help consumers understand why more and more estheticians are wearing gloves during services.

Gloves are often used in esthetic services to protect the client, and the technician from transmission of potentially infectious microbes (OPIM).  These tiny organisms cannot be seen by the human eye, or even with the magnifying glasses commonly found in a treatment room.  If you have ever had a manicure and noticed an irritated cuticle the next day, or had a waxing done and then experienced tiny red papules in the area, this is likely caused by those microbes.

Today’s technicians are taught to practice infection control and the prevention of cross contamination.  During a wax procedure this would include wearing gloves, disinfecting the area, remove the hair and then disinfect the skin again.  Each step is an important link it preventing irritation or infection.

Any time your esthetician performs an exfoliation treatment; microdermabrasion, scrubs, galvanic, chemical peels, or ultrasonic, it can allow tiny portals in the skin to let bacteria in or out. The same is true for extraction. To protect both the client and the technician, gloves may be worn for the duration of the treatment.  It is that extra step to protect you that is important to us, your professional estheticians. Even if there is no visible openings in the skin, we do not want to risk transmitting a microbe from ourselves or any other object in the treatment room onto a “potentially” open surface.

Some states now require all technicians to wear gloves for all treatments.  They are taking a pro-active stance to prevent any possible problem.  The good news?  Today’s gloves are thin, protective and have great tactile feel.  You probably won’t even know your esthetician is wearing them.

Most estheticians no longer use latex gloves, but if you have a latex allergy please do bring it to their attention.  Today’s gloves are generally vinyl or nytrile. They should be exam glove quality.  In the future you can expect to see more nytrile gloves in use as they are much more environmentally friendly, even though the cost of use is still more than vinyl.

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Permanent Eyeliner Styles and Tips

Permanent eyeliner is the process of implanting pigment into the skin.  It is a form of tattooing. While it is permanent, it does require the color be refreshed periodically.  Frequency of re-enhancements depends on the technician’s skill with their device, but also it depends a lot on the client.  Certain medications and/or medical conditions seem to cause more color loss or quicker fade.  The more medications the client is taking the odds are the color won’t hold quiet as long before needing refreshed.  I typically see my clients every 2-5 years.  The eye is a sensitive area but because of the thinness of the skin, the area responds very well to

During an initial consultation always wear your eyeliner so your technician can see what your style and goals are.  Very wide eyeliner, tails and wings are a bad idea with cosmetic tattooing because the tattoo does not age well.  And what looks good on us in our 30’s or 40’s may not look so good in our 60’s, 70’s or 80’s.  Why?  Because when we apply cosmetics topically we automatically make adjustments as our face changes with time.  The tattoo in the skin can’t do this.  So we need to take a more classical approach and add the fashion look with cosmetics when it is appropriate.

People who are sporty naturals and don’t want a “made up” look, love lash enhancement.  With lash enhancement tiny dots of pigment are placed in between the lashes. The healed result is the appearance of thicker lashes.  This works well for both women and men.  I have found it works best for clients who have darker lashes.  For those with blond lashes, the dots don’t blend in as well.  For those with blond eyelashes, go for a very thin line. Anyone can wear a thin natural look eyeliner.

A classical eyeliner starts with a natural eyeliner but then widens it out a bit. For safety reasons, eyeliner should not go closer to the tear duct than the last eyelash, nor should it extend beyond the last eyelash at the outer corner.  The structure of the skin changes at that point and there is a high risk of migration which is not correctable. If you want it to extend farther or you like to have the outer corner upper connect to the outer corner lower, this is better done with makeup.  Classical eyeliner can be applied either narrower on the inner corner and wider as it moves to the outer corner or in a dome where the widest part is directly over the iris.

If you like a slightly more smudgy look, this can be achieved with a halo color.  A halo color is an additional line placed just above the upper eyeliner. It is designed to disperse more and give a soft halo to the eyeliner.  Halo colors are lighter and softer than the black or off-black eyeliner colors. Most pigment manufacturers have moved away from the dated green, violet and navy eyeliners, opting instead to recommend dark brown, brown black or black.  While I used to do dark brown or brown black, I now avoid this whenever possible.  Browns are a much weaker color and fade faster. Black goes into the skin better and stays much longer.  For clients that feel black is too harsh for them, a deep moss or charcoal color is a good alternative.

Many ophthalmologists recommend permanent eyeliner for their clients who have a lot of allergies or sensitive eyes. Its also great for people who have lost their close up vision or struggle with dexterity.  Permanent makeup does not smear, smudge, or bother your contact lenses. It stays on right through whatever your busy lifestyle may encounter.  To help it last the longest, wear dark glasses when you are exposed to UV light.

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